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Feng Shui For Dogs

By The Dog Daily Expert

“Fido Feng Shui,” as it’s sometimes known, has an increasing number of followers. Feng Shui is an ancient system based on the belief that the flow of chi, or energy, permeates both our inner selves and the environments that we inhabit. It has to do with the art of placing objects appropriately to improve overall well-being.

Feng shui can take on a spiritual approach, or it can simply be considered from an interior design standpoint. There is no question that certain spaces make us feel better due to the lighting, furniture, color schemes and more. Dogs also respond to all of these elements, so they too can potentially benefit from feng shui practices.

Wendy Nan Rees and Kristen Hampshire, authors of the Dog Lover’s Daily Companion: 365 Days of Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Living a Rich Life With Your Dog, offer the following tips:

  • Don’t place your dog’s bed under a window or in a corner. Chi could stagnate in such spots, say Rees and Hampshire.
  • There shouldn’t be any water elements where the dog sleeps, since they could disturb rest, according to feng shui beliefs.
  • Don’t place your dog’s bed directly across from an open door at the end of a long corridor. Feng shui holds that chi could flow away from the bed and out the door too quickly.
  • Don’t put heavy objects above or behind your dog’s bed.
  • Minimize usage of mirrors, which reflect light and could frighten your pet.
  • Avoid using bedding that is made of synthetic fabrics.
  • Put your dog’s bed against a solid wall away from any doors that could swing open.
  • Consider placing your dog’s bed on the opposite side of the house from the active front door or garage.

Some of these tips are based on common sense. Heavy objects, such as lighting, shelves or cabinets, shouldn’t be placed behind your dog’s bed in case they fall. There’s also a sense of awareness that we have around such objects. If you are standing under a heavy bookcase, for example, part of you might be concerned about it toppling over. Dogs may not have such a worry, but they would perceive the bookcase and therefore be affected by it in some way.

Feng shui also seeks to maintain balance in life. You are probably familiar with the terms “yin” and “yang,” which represent opposite extremes. It’s just one belief system of many that, for followers, can help make life a bit more pleasant and harmonious for people and their pets.

Copyright (c) 2011 Studio One Networks. All rights reserved.


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