Monday, October 20, 2014
 
 
 
 
 
The German government is canceling a contract with Verizon over fears the company could be letting U.S. intelligence agencies eavesdrop on official communications. The Interior Ministry says it will let its current contract for Internet services with the New York-based company expire in 2015. Germany has been at the forefront of international outrage over alleged electronic eavesdropping by the U.S. Ministry spokesman Tobias Plate said Thursday that Germany wants to ensure it has full control over highly sensitive government communications networks.

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The German government is canceling a contract with Verizon over fears the company could be letting U.S. intelligence agencies eavesdrop on official communications. The Interior Ministry says it will let its current contract for Internet services with the New York-based company expire in 2015. Germany has been at the forefront of international outrage over alleged electronic eavesdropping by the U.S. Ministry spokesman Tobias Plate said Thursday that Germany wants to ensure it has full control over highly sensitive government communications networks.

  [READ MORE]
 
The German government is canceling a contract with Verizon over fears the company could be letting U.S. intelligence agencies eavesdrop on official communications. The Interior Ministry says it will let its current contract for Internet services with the New York-based company expire in 2015. Germany has been at the forefront of international outrage over alleged electronic eavesdropping by the U.S. Ministry spokesman Tobias Plate said Thursday that Germany wants to ensure it has full control over highly sensitive government communications networks.

  [READ MORE]
 
Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday introduced legislation in the Senate and the House of Representatives to ban deals where Web content companies could pay Internet service providers to deliver their traffic to users faster and more reliably. The bicameral bill by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Representative Doris Matsui of California comes as the Federal Communications Commission is collecting public comments on new "net neutrality" rules.  [READ MORE]
 
Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday introduced legislation in the Senate and the House of Representatives to ban deals where Web content companies could pay Internet service providers to deliver their traffic to users faster and more reliably. The bicameral bill by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy of Vermont and Representative Doris Matsui of California comes as the Federal Communications Commission is collecting public comments on new "net neutrality" rules.  [READ MORE]
 
As Iraq's government struggles to contain the al-Qaeda-inspired militants sweeping the north of the country , it is taking the fight to cyberspace. Iraq's Ministry of Communications has ordered the country's Internet service providers to shut down Internet access completely in five different regions, according to a letter sent to the ISPs on Sunday and later leaked online. This the government's latest attempt to contain the ISIL's use of the Internet and social media for propaganda and recruitment purposes.

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