Thursday, April 24, 2014
 
 
by Grab Media, a blinkx company
Google Fiber could get some competition from AT&Ts own ultra-fast fiber network. On Monday, the telecommunications giant announced that it was looking to expand its ATT U-verse with GigaPowerSM service to 100 markets. No, its not the catchiest name for a broadband service. But it does promise blazing-fast speeds of up to 1 gigabit per second, the same as Google Fiber. Right now, U-verse is only in one market: Austin, Texas. The 100 additional markets AT&T is eyeing include 21 major metropolitan areas like Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco.   [READ MORE]
 
 
 
Netflix Inc, the video streaming service, on Monday criticized AT&T's high-speed fiber network as inadequate and slow, while renewing its call for AT&T to interconnect directly with Netflix. Netflix made the remarks in a letter to shareholders on its first-quarter results. The company has been calling for greater protections for open Internet rules, also known as net neutrality, which require Internet service providers to give consumers equal access to all lawful content without restrictions or tiered charges.   [READ MORE]
 
Netflix Inc, the video streaming service, on Monday criticized AT&T's high-speed fiber network as inadequate and slow, while renewing its call for AT&T to interconnect directly with Netflix. Netflix made the remarks in a letter to shareholders on its first-quarter results.   [READ MORE]
 
Tech giant Google Inc. has acquired solar-powered drone maker Titan Aerospace as part of its strategy to deliver wireless Internet access to remote parts of the world. Titan is developing a variety of solar-powered "atmospheric satellites," which are designed to stay aloft indefinitely, providing aerial and telecommunications services at 1/100th the cost of current satellite platforms. Ben Gruber has more.   [READ MORE]
 
In an extensive post, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings called for “strong net neutrality,” as opposed to the “weak net neutrality that currently exists, and which allows ISPs to theoretically, if not actually, bully Internet businesses into paying fees in order for consumers to be able to enjoy their services at better speeds. Hastings said "The essence of net neutrality is that ISPs such as AT&T and Comcast dont restrict, influence or otherwise meddle with the choices consumers make. The traditional form of net neutrality which was recently overturned by a Verizon lawsuit is important, but insufficient."   [READ MORE]
 
AT&T on Friday dismissed Netflix's recent call for free interconnection as an arrogant and unfair attempt to force others to pay for the content provider to gain access to faster broadband speeds and better services. Jim Cicconi, AT&T's senior executive vice president for external and legislative affairs wrote in a company blog post "As we all know, there is no free lunch, and there's also no cost-free delivery of streaming movies. Someone has to pay that cost. Mr. Hastings' arrogant proposition is that everyone else should pay but Netflix." The post was a rebuttal to comments published by Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings on Thursday calling for greater protections for open Internet rules   [READ MORE]
 
The battle rages on between Netflix and the country's biggest Internet service providers. Netflix CEO Reed Hastings said in a blog post Thursday that the company will pay more ISPs to ensure a good customer experience, but slammed those providers for "extracting a toll because they can." It's the latest in a fight over whether Netflix and other data-heavy services should have to shoulder part of the cost of getting that content to customers.   [READ MORE]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





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