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Grass Valley EDIUS version 7
Along with AVID Composer, Sony Vegas Pro 12, Adobe Premiere Pro CC and FCP, EDIUS 7 delivers at the Big End of Video Editing
By David Hague

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   Maybe it is just my perception, but it seems to me above the 'consumer level' of video editing packages in the realms of the 'pro' area, the packages most seem to identify with are the offerings from AVID, Sony (Vegas Pro), Adobe Premiere and Apple's Final Cut.

  I mention this, because if you are not aware there is another from Grass Valley - the recently update to version 7 EDIUS. (EDIUS is an acronym for 'Editors Ultimate Solution by the way). 

  Overview

  Between different editors, little varies between the actual editing processes these days.  Let's face it, no-one (at a professional level) has yet to better the in and out point / preview-playback window/timeline metaphor as yet.

So what remains is the workflow methodology, implementation and functionality. It is a truism that editors are very personal; they are treated by users almost with the same evangelical zeal and protection as Ford versus Holden or Apple versus Windows.

 

 

64 Bit

Similar to other modern NLEs, EDIUS 7 unlike previous 'versions requires Windows 7 or greater and the 64 bit version to run. Grass Valley say that the older 32 bit supporting EDIUS 6.5 will be available for 'a limited time'.

The major reason for the need for a 64 bit O/S is simple; the current compression methods used on today's file formats need some serious grunt to manipulate. As such, 64 bit is needed, and the more logical processors you can access, the better (in the processor).

 

 

 

And this is going to exacerbate with the advent now of 4K cameras (UHDef) as well as 3D and so on.

Out of the box, EDIUS 7 supports all of these formats - Grass Valley state quite categorically EDIUS will work with any mix on the timeline of everything from SD right through to 24 x 24 to 4K x 24 - all in real time. Additionally, it has partnered with Blackmagic Design to support its PCIe Decklink 4K, Extreme Thunderbolt based UltraStudio 4K capture devices and EDL project colour correction interchange with DaVinci Resolve.

Additionally, there is support for other manufacturers slated for later this year, notably AJA and Matrox. Manufacturer specific file formats that EDIUS 7 will read without any need for conversion includes Canon XF/EOS Movie, Ikegami GFCam, Panasonic P2,  Sony XDCAM as well as XAVC and XAVC S, RED and of course AVCHD.

New in version 7

Rather than adding any drastically radical major new enhancements to version 6.5, version 7 instead provides improvements to existing functionality taking advantage of the newer processors letting you work in real time in not only an editing workflow, but also transcoding between 4K, HD and SD resolutions including aspect ratio changes and frame rates. Improvements have to been made in the handling of large numbers of still image files including JPG, TGA and DPX.

For output to MPEG and H.264/AVC, the speed and quality have been greatly improved with optimization for the latest 4th generation Intel Core processor architecture.

Limitless

For complex projects, EDIUS 7 has no limitation on the number of tracks live in the timeline. Any mix and number of video, audio, graphics and title tracks can be used. If access to a high speed computer is not available, then low resolution proxy editing is supported. This is especially a bonus for those who double up with a lesser spec'd laptop say for remote work.

Finally, for the fans (of which I am unashamedly one) 3D stereoscopic editing support is there as is direct to disc burning for both Blu-ray and DVD.

In putting EDIUS 7 through its paces to saviour its 'feel', it is obvious that the interface has been designed with the more experienced in mind. A newcomer to EDIUS from a consumer oriented system such as from Cyberlink say could be extremely intimidated, not just by the breadth of possibilities, but also the massive 497 page manual!

Manual

Whilst I applaud Grass Valley for producing a real life (albeit electronic) manual that is one of the most comprehensive I have seen in this field, not so many kudos for accessibility. It is not on the install disc, but instead has to be downloaded. First you have to find it though, and that took me a good 20 mins of prodding and poking through the Grass Valley website, as all searches I used kept coming back with references to version 6.5.

Conclusion

For the price, which is actually astonishing value for money considering the capabilities here, you get a very good, fully featured NLE well up to the rigours and technical needs of today. A trial version is available.

Australian Videocamera Ratings

 

 

Product:

Grass Valley EDIUS version 7

 

 

Ease of use:

            8

Build quality:

            9

Features:

            10

Help:

            7

Setup:

            8

Value for Money:

            9

We Liked:

Full featured, very fast, comprehensive manual

 

We Disliked:

Some basics seem a bit quirky if switching from another NLE

Price:

Full ver $850.00 inc GST
Upgrade from 6.5 $373.00 inc GST
X-Grade $492.00 inc GST

Contact:

Corsair Solutions

Website:

www.corsairsolutions.com.au

I'd value your thoughts on this article. Please send them to via david@auscamonline.com - or better still, why not join Australian Videocamera and leave a comment here for others to also chat about. Simply click "Subscribe" at top right and create an account! It's free and also allows you to use our classified systems (also free) and even submit events and stories!


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David is the owner and publisher of Australian Videocamera. He has a background in media dating back to 1979 when he first got involved with photojournalism in motorsport, and went from there into technology via a 5 year stint with Tandy Computers.

Moving back to WA, David wrote scripts for Computer Television for video training for the just released Windows and Office 95 among others, and was then lured to Sydney to create web sites for the newly commercial Internet in 1995, building hundreds of sites under contract to OzEmail including Coates Hire, Hertz Queensland, John Williamson, the NSW Board of Studies and many, many more.

David can be contacted via  david@auscamonline.com


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





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